Circa 1880 Elihu Thomson Jumping Ring Electro-magnetic Laboratory Demonstration Device ex. Smith College for Women 19th Century Physics Lab Collection

Circa 1880 Elihu Thomson Jumping Ring Electro-magnetic Laboratory Demonstration Device ex. Smith College for Women 19th Century Physics Lab Collection

Stock Number: FG8

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The jumping ring device was used to demonstrate magnetic levitation of various composition rings. This device in part provided the foundation for development of various electrical magnetic application including for instance high speed rail, etc. Elihu Thomson was a landmark pioneer, a biographical sketch follows.

Dimensions

10 inches x 10 inches x 18 inches

Circa

1880

Country of manufacture

North America

Categories: Scientific, Technology

Description

Details include a single 5 inch x 4 inch vertical coil with internal 1.5 inch diameter adjustable height multi-rod armature. The coil section mounted atop a 6 inch diameter x .5 inch  mahogany platform with twin original brass wire terminal connectors each with knurled clamp screw, the platform with 1 and 3/4 inch diameter knurled heavy brass armature clamp all mounted on three 7 inch tapered and turned mahogany columns supported on a 10 inch x 10 inch base.

Final details include steel, aluminum and brass rings with heavy copper 3 1/2 inch x 1 inch x 3/4 inch ring with provision for fluid insertion, the ring with fine light damascened top surface. Marked in hand 15kz. Note.. with tag noting 30v from wall ac/20 amp from power supply tested with Variac in excellent complete original condition and patina. 

The jumping ring device was used to demonstrate magnetic levitation of various composition rings. This device in part provided the foundation for development of various electrical magnetic application including for instance high speed rail, etc. Elihu Thomson was a landmark pioneer, a biographical sketch follows. 

Overall height to copper ring tube 18 inches. Overall weight 18 lbs.  

Biographical info: Elihu Thomson was born in England on March 29, 1853. He would later become one of the most prolific inventors in U.S. history and would join Thomas Edison to form one of the most pervasive companies in the world, General Electric.

At GE, Thomson was considered a “scientific sage,” and he helped establish a tradition of regular product improvement and scientific research that led to the creation of GE’s first research laboratory in 1900. Before the turn of the century, he also developed equipment for GE the production of x-rays, and demonstrated the use of x-ray pictures for diagnosing bone fractures and finding foreign objects in the body.

In a career that spanned five decades, Thomson was granted 696 U.S. patents on various types of inventions related to electricity, including arc lights, generators, electric welding machines, and x-ray tubes. He also contributed to the invention of the high-frequency dynamo and the transformer. His creation of the recording wattmeter, a practical method of measuring the amount of electricity used by a home or business, brought him additional fame and fortune. Toward the end of his life he shared his knowledge and experience with students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an electrical engineering professor there and served as acting president of the university from 1920 to 1922. He died in 1937.

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