L’attractif de d’Estanque by Charriere, C 1865

L’attractif de d’Estanque by Charriere, C 1865

Stock Number: 340218 m

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Dimensions

20 cm long

Circa

1865

Country of manufacture

France

Categories: Medicine, Dentistry

Description

An attractif d’estanques,  a kind of a dental pelican of mechanical complexity, C. 1865, stamped “Charriere a Paris”. Finely shaped of steel, 20 cm long, and features a spring-loaded grip activating a mechanical retraction of the upper serrated jaw. It is a nearly parallel motion, guided by linear slots, and brings the jaws together smoothly and securely. An adjustable spring arm controls tension between the jaws – a desirable feature because the tool provides enormous leverage. Condition is fine noting light staining to the steel.

D’Estanque’s instrument is of remarkable complexity, and remarkable rarity. It was offered in the Mathieu catalogue, and one is illustrated in Elisabeth Bennion’s Antique Dental Instruments (plate 65). She writes: “An extremely complicated type of pelican with two handles was that designed by Eugene d’Estanque and patented by him in 1861. He illustrated it in L’Union Medicale in 1864 and it was made by Charriere and Mathieu with considerable mechanical skill.

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NL Van Leest Antiques

Van Leest Antiques

Van Leest Antiques, based in Utrecht in the Netherlands, specialises in antique scientific and medical instruments. Their collection covers mainly scientific and medical antique instruments: barometers, globes and planataria, nautical instruments, anatomical models, and pharmacy items. Toon Van Leest travels regularly in Europe and visits trade fairs, auctions, and antique dealers to collect stock and to find pieces to fulfil his clients' unusual requests.

As well as being an avid antique collector and dealer, Toon Van Leest is also a dentist. He believes that antiques are a stable investment, not reliant on trends or fashion, and have truly lasting value. Above all, he says, antiques are timeless and never lose their beauty.