Archives

TWO BOOKS ON SUNDIALS

FULLY TRACKED SHIPPING ARRANGED  Contact Email:  michaelread060@gmail.com Read More...

Very Nice Fauth Alidade – Circa 1902 – U.S. Reclamation Service (USRS)

This is a very nice Fauth Alidade made by George Saegmuller for the United States Reclamation Service.  The USRS was formed in 1902, and I suspect this instrument was made within a few years of the formation.   The telescope is 13.5 inches long and has GREAT optics.  The image is inverted, which allows more light to come thru the scope.  The trade-off, of course, is that the image is upside down. I didn’t see any crosshairs in the scope.   The Alidade has a base Read More...

Esmarch WW1-Era Anesthesia Kit

Esmarch WW1-era anesthesia kit. Quoting from the Wood Library site: “German surgeon Friedrich von Esmarch (1823-1908) introduced this inhaler in 1877. Cloth was stretched over the wire frame, providing a large surface for evaporation.  Chloroform was dripped onto the cloth until the latter became saturated. More chloroform could be added as the agent evaporated.  At the same time, the frame keeps the soaked cloth from touching the patient’s face, preventing skin irritation.  Packed together with a chloroform flask, gauze and Read More...

Ainsworth Solar Transit – S/N 2946 – Nice Condition – Circa 1915

This is a really neat circa 1915 Ainsworth Solar Compass.   Ainsworth had a unique approach to attaching a Saegmueller Solar unit to a transit.  Ainsworth would modify a Saegmueller solar unit to fit on a mining transit designed for a second scope and counterweight (like Berger used).  I’ve asked around and Ainsworth was apparently the only maker who took this approach.     Note that the counterweight loop is only a half loop.  I have no idea what that’s about – Read More...

Nathan Storrs Plain Compass and Matching Tripod – Circa 1795

Nathan Storrs was born in Mansfield, Connecticut in 1768. Nathan’s family engaged in jewelry making, silver-smithing, and other related activities.     In 1792, he formed a partnership with Samuel Stiles as Stiles & Storrs. This partnership quickly dissolved and in 1792 Nathan joined Jedidah Baldwin in business as Baldwin & Storrs. This partnership lasted until 1793 when Baldwin moves to Hanover, NH. After that Storrs operated on his own for the most part. Nathan Storrs had perhaps the broadest range of engraving Read More...

Unsigned Colonial Era Compass – Copper Compass Face & Dovetail Sight Vanes

This is a fascinating compass. The compass is an odd blend or primitive craftsmanship with some sophisticated design details. On the primitive side, there is very little engraving and the numbers appear to be punched rather than engraved. Additionally, there is no needle lifter, and the sight vanes appear misaligned slightly to my eye. Hard to tell though.     The sophisticated design features include cool dovetail sight vane holders, with a hefty screw holding each vane in place. This solved the Read More...

Small Lietz Mining Transit – Nice Condition – Circa 1925

One of my favorite things about this little instrument – Lietz made the instrument so that it lays in its box rather than stands upright. A very cool feature in my opinion.   The optics on both scopes are good, with all cross and stadia hairs present (only the main scope has stadia hairs). The caps and sunscreens are present as well.   The transit comes complete with its box and tripod, as shown below.   Lietz Model 12 Mountain and Mining Transits that have Read More...

Oscar Hanks Bow Compass – Circa Early 1840s

There are very few truly American designed instruments; the bow instruments are unique to the patentee, Julius and his son Oscar Hanks, who manufactured instruments in Troy NY during the mid 19th century.  The silvered compass dial is signed by engraving, “O. Hanks Troy NY.” The instrument stands over an impressive 19″ tall on a lathe-turned stand. The bow is over 11″ in diameter and the needle is approximately 5.25″ in length. The button-weighted Hanks needle is a very unique Read More...

ORIGINAL TINTYPE PHOTO OF SURVEYING CREW

ORIGINAL TINTYPE PHOTO OF SURVEYING CREW, American, c.1880. Measuring 2-1/4″ x 3-1/2″ (5.7 x 8.9 cm) , this outdoor tintype shows a full party of five relatively well-dressed men, including the bearded axe man with his gold watch chain, sitting on a bundle of wood stakes, the transit man with his well-polished shoes, protecting his instrument, a very young rod man with long banded rod, and two supervisors(?), one wearing a remarkable multiple tie. Despite some creases to the Read More...

An Example of the Locke Adder First Patent 24 December 1901

An attractive example of Art Nouveau designed Locke Adder. Invented by Clarence Locke (1865-1945) this is the first patent which was improved by a second in 1905. This was the first American adder to enjoy commercial success. For more information ssee nzeldes.com. In good working order, possibly missing felt cover to base. Read More...

Two days American Chronometer signed Bond In Boston

Interesting American Chronometer signed W. N Bond In Boston  N·543   Cased in mahogany box. Good condition . Mechanism perfect and function .  Read More...

The invention of the LED: small archive collection

A very nice and historically important collection relating to the invention of the Light Emitting Diode or LED, one of the most important energy efficient technologies of the twentieth century. The highlight of the collection is a preprint version of Nick Holonyak and S.F. Bevacqua, ‘Coherent (Visible) Light Emission from Ga(As1−x Px) Junctions’, Applied Physics Letters 1 (December 1962), pp. 82–83. The standard work on the subject describes this paper as follows: “The beginning of visible-spectrum LEDs dates back to the Read More...